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Eurasian Wrineck
The Eurasian wryneck (Jynx torquilla) is a species of wryneck in the woodpecker family. This species mainly breeds in temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Most populations are migratory, wintering in tropical Africa and in southern Asia from Iran to the Indian Subcontinent, but some are resident in northwestern Africa. It is a bird of open countryside, woodland and orchards. Eurasian wrynecks measure about 16.5 cm (6.5 in) in length and have bills shorter and less dagger-like than those of other woodpeckers. Their upperparts are barred and mottled in shades of pale brown with rufous and blackish bars and wider black streaks. Their underparts are cream speckled and spotted with brown. Their chief prey is ants and other insects, which they find in decaying wood or on the ground. The eggs are white as is the case with many birds that nest in holes and a clutch of seven to ten eggs is laid during May and June. These birds get their English name from their ability to turn their heads through almost 180 degrees. When disturbed at the nest, they use this snake-like head twisting and hissing as a threat display. This odd behaviour led to their use in witchcraft, hence to put a "jinx" on someone.
The Eurasian wryneck sometimes forms small groups during migration and in its winter quarters but in the summer is usually found in pairs. It characteristically holds its head high with its beak pointing slightly upwards. A mutual display that occurs at any time of year involves two birds perched facing each other with their heads far back and beaks wide open, bobbing their heads up and down. Sometimes the head is allowed to slump sideways and hang limply. On other occasions, when excited, the head is shaken and twisted about violently. When disturbed on the nest or held in the hand, the neck contorts and twists in all directions. The bird sometimes feigns death and hangs limply with eyes closed.
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Black headed gull
The black-headed gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus) is a small gull that breeds in much of Europe and Asia, and also in coastal eastern Canada. Most of the population is migratory and winters further south, but some birds reside in the milder westernmost areas of Europe. Some black-headed gulls also spend the winter in northeastern North America, where it was formerly known as the common black-headed gull. As is the case with many gulls, it was previously placed in the genus Larus.
This gull is 38–44 cm (15–17 in) long with a 94–105 cm (37–41 in) wingspan. In flight, the white leading edge to the wing is a good field mark. The summer adult has a chocolate-brown head (not black, although does look black from a distance), pale grey body, black tips to the primary wing feathers, and red bill and legs. The hood is lost in winter, leaving just 2 dark spots. The black-headed gull is a bold and opportunistic feeder. It eats insects, fish, seeds, worms, scraps, and carrion in towns, or invertebrates in ploughed fields with equal relish. It is a noisy species, especially in colonies, with a familiar "kree-ar" call. Its scientific name means laughing gull.This species takes two years to reach maturity. First-year birds have a black terminal tail band, more dark areas in the wings, and, in summer, a less fully developed dark hood. Like most gulls, black-headed gulls are long-lived birds, with a maximum age of at least 32.9 years recorded in the wild, in addition to an anecdote now believed of dubious authenticity regarding a 63-year-old bird.
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Bronze-winged Jacana
The bronze-winged jacana (Metopidius indicus) is a jacana. It is the only member of the genus Metopidius. The jacanas are a group of waders in the family Charadriidae, which are identifiable by their huge feet and claws which enable them to walk on floating vegetation in the shallow lakes that are their preferred habitat. They are found worldwide within the tropical zone. For the origin and pronunciation of the name, see Jacana.The bronze-winged jacana breeds in India and southeast Asia. It is sedentary apart from seasonal dispersion. It lays four black-marked brown eggs in a floating nest. The males, as in some other wader families like the phalaropes, take responsibility for incubation.
They are mainly black, although the inner wings are very dark brown and the tail is red. There is a striking white eyestripe. The yellow bill extends up as a red coot-like frontal shield, and the legs and very long toes are grey.Young birds have brown upperparts. Their underparts are white, with a buff foreneck. The bronze-winged jacana's feeds on insects and other invertebrates picked from the floating vegetation or the water's surface. 


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Bar-headed Goose
The bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) is a goose that breeds in Central Asia in colonies of thousands near mountain lakes and winters in South Asia, as far south as peninsular India. It lays three to eight eggs at a time in a ground nest. The bird is pale grey and is easily distinguished from any of the other grey geese of the genus Anser by the black bars on its head. It is also much paler than the other geese in this genus. In flight, its call is a typical goose honking. A mid-sized goose, it measures 71–76 cm (28–30 in) in total length and weighs 1.87–3.2 kg (4.1–7.1 lb).

The summer habitat is high-altitude lakes where the bird grazes on short grass. The species has been reported as migrating south from Tibet, Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Russia before crossing the Himalaya. The bird has come to the attention of medical science in recent years as having been an early victim of the H5N1 virus, HPAI (highly pathogenic avian influenza), at Qinghai. It suffers predation from crows, foxes, ravens, sea eagles, gulls and others. The total population may, however, be increasing, but it is complex to assess population trends, as this species occurs over more than 2,500,000 km2 (970,000 sq mi).

The bar-headed goose is one of the world's highest-flying birds,[5] having been heard flying across Mount Makalu – the fifth highest mountain on earth at 8,481 m (27,825 ft) – and apparently seen over Mount Everest – 8,848 m (29,029 ft) – although this is a second-hand report with no verification. The challenging northward migration from lowland India to breed in the summer on the Tibetan Plateau is undertaken in stages, with the flight across the Himalaya (from sea-level) being undertaken non-stop in as little as seven hours. Surprisingly, despite predictable tail winds that blow up the Himalayas (in the same direction of travel as the geese), bar-headed geese spurn these winds, waiting for them to die down overnight, when they then undertake the greatest rates of climbing flight ever recorded for a bird, and sustain these climbs rates for hours on end, according to research published in 2011.
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Grey-headed Swamphen
The Grey-headed Swamphen(Earlier known as purple swamphen) is a "swamp hen" in the rail family Rallidae. Also known locally as the pūkeko, African purple swamphen, purple moorhen, purple gallinule or purple coot. From its French name talève sultane, it is also known as the sultana bird.There are 13 or more subspecies of the purple swamphen (depending on the authority) which differ mainly in plumage colour. The subspecies groups are: P. p. porphyrio in the Mediterranean, P. p. madagascariensis in Africa, P. p. poliocephalus in tropical Asia, P. p. melanotus in much of Australasia, P. p. indicus in Indonesia and P. p. pulverulentis in the Philippines. European birds are overall purple-blue, African and south Asian birds have a green back, and Australasian and Indonesian birds have black backs and heads.
The nominate subspecies, P. p. porphyrio (Linnaeus, 1758), is found in Iberia, France, Sardinia and North Africa to Tunisia. P. p. madagascariensis (Latham, 1801) occurs in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar, and resembles the nominate but with bronze green or green-blue back and scapulars. P. p. caspius (Hartert, 1917) from the Caspian Sea area, is like poliocephalus, but larger.
P. p. seistanicus (Zarudny & Harms, 1911) occurs from Iraq to Pakistan, as poliocephalus, but larger; smaller than caspius. P. p. poliocephalus (Latham, 1801) is found from India and Sri Lanka to south China and north Thailand, and has been introduced to Florida. It has cerulean blue scapulars, face throat and breast. P. p. indicus (Horsfield, 1821) occurs from Sumatra to Sulawesi and Bali, and has a large shield, black upperparts, and the side of the head is blackish. P. p. virdis (Begbie, 1834) occurs in South East Asia, and resembles indicus but the side of the head is cerulean blue. P. p. pulverulentus (Temminck, 1826) from the Philippines has olive-chestnut mantle and scapulars, and the whole plumage is tinged with ash-grey.
P.p. melanotus (Temminck, 1820) occurs in north and east Australia, New Zealand and the surrounding islands. It has a small shield, shorter toes, black upperparts, and a purple throat and breast. P. p. pelewensis (Hartlaub & Finsch, 1872) from Palau, resembles melanotus but has greener upperparts and is smaller. P. p. melanopterus (Bonaparte, 1856) is found from the Lesser Sundas and Moluccas to New Guinea. It is as melanotus but smaller, more variable and less blue in the upperparts. P. p. bellus (Gould, 1820) from West Australia is as melanotus but has a cerulean blue throat and breast. P. p. samoensis (Peale, 1848) occurs from New Guinea to New Caledonia and Samoa, and is as melanotus but smaller, with a brown tinge on the back. (Wikipedia)
(This picture was taken at purbasthli near Nabadwip of West Bengal)


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Debasish Sengupta
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:iconraisedfists:
RaisedFists Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you greatly for faving my work  Ayano Tateyama (Bows) [V12] 
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.:) (Smile) 
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Parinferal Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
You're welcome Heart 
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Nod :D (Big Grin) 
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TornadoWeirdo Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool bird photos! Jesus Christ loves you!
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:) (Smile) 
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MYPeanutGallery Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2017
Heart by KmyGraphic

Thanks for the Fave!
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.Love 
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Trippy4U Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2017
Thanks kindly :peace:
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Welcome:D (Big Grin) 
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OrnateHawk-Taxidermy Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2017
thanks for the fav :la:
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.:D (Big Grin) 
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Berlin-Steglitz Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2017
Many thanks for the +fav  :) (Smile) 
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.:) (Smile) 
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Maria-Schreuders Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much for taking the time to fave and comment on my photo  :+fav: :heart:  I really appreciate this
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
It was a beautiful photo.:) (Smile) 
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ov3 Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for the fav :)
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.
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PridesCrossing Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2017
:iconsomehugsplz: Thanks for the :iconbigfav4plz:
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.Love 
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PridesCrossing Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2017
:heart:
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Maria-Schreuders Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
I wil thank you for the constant support of my photos, and favs :+fav: :heart:
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
That's why friends are for.
I too got the same support from you and appreciate it.
Heart Hug 
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Maria-Schreuders Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Hug Heart  Yes I think so too 
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DebasishPhotos Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Clap Love 
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